Every-day Rules, 1924

Some “Every-day Rules” from a Dr West in the Gloucestershire Echo from 1924.

Dr West is in favour of calmness and consideration, kindness and fairness. I can’t argue with him really. His “Never dispute with a man who is more then seventy years of age, nor with an enthusiast,” is invaluable.

And, it’s funny, but “Do not jest so as to wound the feelings of another,” would be described as “Political correctness gone mad” these days, by certain types with less consideration for others.

The Gloucestershire Echo, 11th January 1924

The Gloucestershire Echo, 11th January 1924

Every-day Rules

Never ridicule sacred things, or what others may esteem as such, however absurd they may appear to you.

Never resent a supposed injury till you know the views and motives of the author of it. On no occasion relate it.

Always take the part of an absent person who is censured in company, so far as truth and propriety will allow.

Never think worse of another on account of his differing in political and religious subjects.

Never dispute with a man who is more than seventy years of age, nor with an enthusiast.

Do not jest so as to wound the feelings of another.

Say as little as possible of yourself and of those who are near to you.

Never court the favour of the rich by flattering either their vanities or their vices.

Speak with calmness and deliberation, especially in circumstances which tend to irritate. – Dr West.

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